Archive for August, 2013

“SICILY: ART AND INVENTION BETWEEN GREECE AND ROME”

Friday, August 16th, 2013

“Statue of a Youth (The Mozia Charioteer), Sicilian Greek,
marble, 470-460 B.C., 71″ tall

One of the finest sculptural achievements in Western Art, and certainly from the Classical Period, is the Sicilan Greek statue known as “The Mozia Charioteer” (470-460 B.C.) Pose, gaze, and the idealized human form, which bursts forth beneath a diaphanous garment, declare a powerful eroticism. Discovered on the small island of Mozia in 1979, the sculpture is being shown for the first time in America. It stands as the centerpiece of “Sicily: Art and Invention Between Greece and Rome” at the Getty Villa. until August 19.

“Statue of a Youth (The Mozia Charioteer)”
rear view

From the fifth to the third centuries, an opulent lifestyle was enjoyed in ancient Sicily. From the fine arts to the culinary arts, the good life flourished amidst intellectual achievement and innovation. Among the 145 objects, highlights include a beautiful lidded wedding vase of pigmented terracotta as well as an ink on parchment text page from “Archimedes Palimpsest”. See it this weekend!

LABOUR & WAIT”, SANTA BARBARA MUSEUM OF ART

Friday, August 2nd, 2013

Jane Wilbraham, “Index”, 2010-2011, at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art

One of the freshest shows of the year to-date, “Labour & Wait” examines the ideals of labor and craftsmanship in contemporary art. It celebrates the hand in artmaking as distinct from art that is manufactured or reliant on technology. The exhibition features approximately fifteen artists of unique vision that together form a provocative whole.

Tim Hawkinson at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art

Tonico Lemos Auad, crocheted sculpture, Santa Barbara Museum

The seminal film by Fischli and Weiss, “The Way Things Go (1987), opens the show and embodies some of the strong themes in the exhibition which include time, effort, continuity, spontaneity, progress and the possibilities of the everyday that surround us. Works range from Allison Smith’s towering sculpture of wood furniture that addresses American colonial and Civil War histories to Tonico Lemos Auad’s delicate crocheted chandeliers that invoke the spiritual with their gentle light. Timothy Hawkinson’s sculpture of a woman at her spinning wheel showcases his wizardry with disparate materials.  (more…)