Archive for the 'Museums' Category

Around Town 2

Tuesday, May 5th, 2009

 

"Hercules", The Getty Villa

"Hercules", The Getty Villa

I recently spent three days touring Los Angeles with the Director and trustees of the Virigina Museum of Fine Art.  Successive visits to our great institutions underlined the extraordinary visual wealth that surrounds us. Focused on classical treasures, we began at the Getty Villa.  The permanent collection as well as the four temporary exhibitions, including the seductive “Lasting Allure of Ancient Gems”, was impressive and edifying.   Viewing was made especially lively with a very knowledgable docent.  Sans docent, I highly recommend the complimentary audio along with the map of  Highlights.  These tools will make your visit to the Villa one of insight and pleasure.  Getty Villa

 

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Guido Reni, "Joseph and Potiphar's Wife", Getty Center

 At the Getty Center, “Captured Emotions: Baroque Painting in Bologna 1575-1725″  was a highly engaging  exhibition focused on the Carracci family of painters from Bologna.  During a time when painting was thought to be stagnant, Annibale and Agostino, and their cousin Ludovico were  changing  the course of art history.  They set standards that were to remain authoritative for 200 years, influencing artists such as Guido Reni.  The show ended May 3, but the enlightened catalog is available in the bookstore.  Getty Center 

 

Gamble House, Pasadena

Gamble House, Pasadena

Pasadena’s glory is almost boundless, starting with the Gamble House.  If you’ve never been or haven’t been lately, put it on your list.  Designed by Charles and Henry Greene in 1908 for David and Mary Gamble of the Procter and Gamble Company, it is one of the outstanding examples of  American  Arts and Crafts style architecture.  The level of commitment and quest for quality from  both the architects and the clients is truly an inspiration.  Reservations required for the tour.  Gamble House

 

Pablo Picasso, "Girl with a Book", Norton Simon Museum

Pablo Picasso, "Girl with a Book", Norton Simon Museum

The Norton Simon Museum is a gift on every visit.   One of the greatest private collections ever assembled by an individual,  it comprises more than 12,000 works of art from from the Renaissance to the 20th century as well as remarkable work  of South and Southeast Asian art spanning 2,000 years.  In preparation for our visit, I recently reread Suzanne Muchnic’s informative biography “Odd Man In”.  Not only does it detail Simon’s passion for collecting, it comments extensively on the history and  growth of LA’s art institutions.  It also details Simon’s legendary machinations involved in the acquisition of specifc works, such as Rembrandt’s “Titus”. Insight gained from the book makes the work even more compelling.   Norton Simon Museum

 

Treasures Through Six Generations, Weng Collection, Huntington Library

Treasures Through Six Generations, Weng Collection, Huntington Library

Exhibitions at the Huntington just keep getting better.  This small but exquisite show of calligraphy and paintings from the Weng Collection offer another example of erudite collecting on the part of an individual collector.  Beautiful examples of scroll paintings and calligraphy are presented for optimum viewing and are fascinating even for viewers less familiar with this genre.

 

Desert Garden, Huntington Library

Desert Garden, Huntington Library

Lastly, no trip to the Huntington is complete without a stroll through the Desert Garden.  At this time of the year many plants are in bloom.  The whole garden is incredibly exotic and visually arresting.  It is a premier place to contemplate the power of sculpture, as these plants rival  the best of it.  And of course, the other gardens are a delight, including the recently completed Chinese Garden based on the classical gardens in Suzhou, China.

New York

Wednesday, April 8th, 2009

 

Jenny Holzer, Whitney Museum

Jenny Holzer, Whitney Museum

On the way back from Dubai, I stopped in New York for a few days to process my jetlag and catch up on a few shows.   The Jenny Holzer  exhibition at the Whitney is dynamic.  Holzer creates sculpture out of text, seduces with light and movement , all the while keeping the content probing and relevant.   The show has that Wow Factor that is especially heady on the Whitney’s fourth floor.  Whitney Museum

 

Lisa Yuskavage

Lisa Yuskavage

There were a number of worthy gallery shows, some with gratifying red dots on the price list.  Among them was Gordon Cheung’s show at Jack Shainman and Kamrooz Aram at Perry Rubinstein, also on the cover of Art in America, March issue.  The real standout was Lisa Yuskavage’s exhibition at David Zwirner.  Her paint and  provocation are a signficant force.  Definitely not a show you would see in Dubai!  David Zwirner Gallery

Middle East

Tuesday, April 7th, 2009
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Islamic Museum, Doha, Qatar

 

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Interior, Islamic Museum

 

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Necklace, Islamic Museum

 

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Bronze mask, Islamic Museum

I returned last week from a fascinating trip to Qatar and the UAE.  The Islamic Museum in Doha, which opened in November, is spectacular.  The collection was acquired primarily at auction over  approximately the past twenty years.  The beauty, rarity and quality of the objects on view is mesmerizing.  The building is designed by I.M. Pei  and is among the highlights of his career.  Islamic Museum

 

Art Dubai and the Sharjah Biennele made it a dense and productive trip.  I am a big fan of emerging market art fairs, especially in their early stages.  There is a dramatic sense of discovery and an authentic effort from the organizers, gallerists, artists and guests that is free from the cynicism and attitude that may permeate more established venues.    The accessibility to everyone and everything is refreshing and full of opportunity.  

 

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Hayv Kahraman

Business at the Fair was uneven as it has been worldwide for the past eight months.  Buyers were cautious and limited.  However booths by L&M from New York and Lisson from London were first rate and would have been admired in Basel.   Paris-based Emmanuel Perrotin had an impressive installation by Farhad Moshiri who has been an auction favorite and sold well.  The Third Line of Dubai sold out work by Hayv Kahraman.  San Francisco gallery, Frey Norris did very well with their artist, Kate Eric.  Galleries were present from Syria, China, India and various European cities.

 

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Nida Sinnokrot

The Sharjah Biennial is in its ninth edition and was the most intriguing to-date.  It was especially interesting to see so many artists that are unknown in the West.   Curators from MOMA, the Tate and multiple institutions from around the world were viewing the exhibition.  Many were in the area as participants in the Global Art Forum, an impressive educational program and think tank that runs parallel to Art Dubai.  Sharjah Biennial

Seattle

Friday, March 6th, 2009

 

Edward Hopper, "Chop Suey"

Edward Hopper, "Chop Suey"

The weather was gray and drizzling in Seattle, but the art had a particular brilliance.    The Seattle Art Museum was presenting the stellar exhibition, “Edward Hopper’s Women”.  Hopper’s close observations of the modern urban woman emerging in society in New York during the 1920’s is exemplified by “Chop Suey” from 1929.  The installation also featured notable images by photograpers such as Walker Evans and Diane Arbus that echoed the Hopper paintings in composition and content.    From the fabulous Cai Guo Qiang installation in the lobby to the Nick Cave sculptures on the upper floor, the Museum offered full compensation for a rainy afternoon.  Seattle Art Museum

 

 

"Gardens for Divine Play" (detail)

"Gardens for Divine Play" (detail)

The Seattle Asian Art Museum was featuring “Garden and Cosmos”, a groundbreaking exhibition of 58 court paintings from the kingdom of Marwar-Jodhpur in western India.  Dated from the 17th to 19th century, most of the pieces have been viewed by only a rare group of scholars since their creation.  Noted for their ingenuity, conceptual content and metaphysical themes, they are a marvel of detail and beauty.  Seattle Asian Art Museum

 

Seattle Central Library

Seattle Central Library

 

Tony Oursler, "Braincast"

Tony Oursler, "Braincast"

The Seattle Central Library designed by Rem Koolhaas is stunning inside and outside.  Not only is the architecture impressive, but the facilities are in demand.  Dozens of computer terminals were in use; crowds filled the library seating, the stacks, and the café.  Artwork commissioned for the library includes pieces by Gary Hill, Ann Hamilton and Tony Oursler.   Titled “Braincast”, the Oursler consists of  three video sculptures that contemplate the transmission of information. It is set into the walls of the escalator between levels  three and five and it sure does enhance the ride!   Rem Koolhaas OMA, Seattle Public Library